A typical homeowner will spend more on flooring than any other part of the home. After all, it’s the foundation of your house both in a functional and aesthetic sense. Not only does it support all your furniture and belongings, it also sets the tone for the rest of your décor. A well-chosen floor will set the stage for a great living space, but the wrong one can ruin an otherwise great design. But if you’re working on a budget, does that mean you have to give up quality altogether?

The good news is no, you don’t have to compromise quality for the price. While durable floors like stone tile are definitely more expensive, they’re not your only choice. Thanks to modern manufacturing, there are now lots of cheaper options that are just as stylish and sturdy. Most of them are also environmentally friendly, so it’s a great choice for those who want to stay green. You just have to know which ones will suit your budget, lifestyle, and personal tastes. Here are some cheap flooring options you may want to try.

Resilient Floors

Resilient flooring refers to a range of budget-friendly materials, often at $1 or less per square foot, that is extremely sturdy for their price. These include vinyl, rubber, and linoleum. They were popular back in the 70’s but were eventually replaced by more expensive materials, such as hardwood and ceramic tile. Today, they are making a comeback as more homeowners opt for practical materials that give you more bang for the buck.

Resilient floors are resistant to mold, mildew, moisture, and cracking, so they go with pretty much any room in the house. You can even find ones that look like real hardwood or stone—talk about getting the same look for less! Most resilient floors come in thin rolls or tiles, both of which can be installed without much assistance. If you’re a complete beginner, you may want to go for tiles because they’re easier to work with. Have a few spare tiles handy so you can replace worn or broken pieces later on.

Resilient Floors

Laminate

A lot of people want solid wood floors but are held back by the heavy price tags. If you’re one of them, you may have considered laminate flooring. Laminate is a material made of several layers of kraft board, cork, or recycled wood, pressed together to form solid tiles and topped with a decorative photographic layer. This layer often features a wood print, so that the planks look like genuine wood. Manufacturers have mastered the craft so that laminate floors can closely resemble any wood, even underfoot.

Installing laminate is a bit harder than resilient, but you can still do it on your own with a bit of planning. Most planks now come with a click-and-lock mechanism, where you only have to press down to make them lock together. Laminate can also be installed on most sub-floors, as long as they’re fairly flat (otherwise the bumps will cause the planks over them to crack). Once it’s installed, all it needs is a bit of sweeping and wiping every few days.

Laminate

Bamboo Floors

This is another great alternative for those who like the classic look of wood. Bamboo flooring has been gaining ground in recent months because of its eco-friendly nature. Unlike wood, it’s not harvested from real trees—it actually comes from a tall, abundant grass that grows fast in many regions of the world. This means they’re in no danger of being wiped out, and harvesting them doesn’t affect the natural habitat of surrounding wildlife.

To the casual viewer, there’s really not much of a difference between bamboo and hardwood floors. Bamboo’s natural color is a light yellowish brown, but various treatments can be added to highlight the grain and make it look like a darker wood. They’re not as sturdy as hardwood, but they come pretty close—and when properly maintained and installed, they can last almost as long and look like new for years.

Quality Flooring On A Budget

Do-it-yourself maintenance

For a floor to really be worth your money, you’ll need to take time to maintain it. A lot of people spend hundreds or even thousands on professional flooring maintenance, but that’s not always necessary. With a bit of flooring how-to and the right tools, you can fix most common problems such as cracks, stains, and squeaky floors. If you have a busy household where the floors get a lot of abuse, going the DIY route will save you a lot in the long run.

Maintenance also works on a day-to-day basis. Take about ten minutes each day to sweep up dirt and dust from the floor, especially around the corners and in between planks or tiles. Wipe up spills as soon as possible, and have the floors resealed every few years to keep them looking like new.

maintenance, but that’s not always necessary. With a bit of flooring how-to and the right tools, you can fix most common problems such as cracks, stains, and squeaky floors. If you have a busy household where the floors get a lot of abuse, going the DIY route will save you a lot in the long run.

Maintenance also works on a day-to-day basis. Take about ten minutes each day to sweep up dirt and dust from the floor, especially around the corners and in between planks or tiles. Wipe up spills as soon as possible, and have the floors resealed every few years to keep them looking like new.

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